​The Real Sunken Madley

The location of Amanda Cadabra was inspired by the picturesque village of Monken Hadley. It is, indeed some '13 miles north of the Houses of Parliament and 3 miles south of the Hertfordshire border'.

The oldest existing recording of the name dates from 1136 and it was sometimes called Monkenchurch. Cottages and a Manor House were later built and until about 30 years ago the villages had a pub, a teashop and a post office. There really was Battle of Barnet fought there in 1471, and the medieval church was rebuilt afterwards.

​​I hope you enjoy the photographs below. I'll be writing more about the real Sunken Madley. Would you like me to let you know when it's ready for you to read?

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Winding road through the village

Gates of one of the large houses

A turret overlooking the village

Cottages just outside the gates

Resident feeding geese

Cottages

A London bus going through the village

Through the gate

View of the village through the church arch

The cottages next to the church

Like the Cadabra’s church, St Ursula-without-Barnet, in Sunken Madely, Monken Hadley’s St Mary is adorned with beautiful stained-glass windows. The couple in the monument could have modelled for Lord and Lady Dunkley of Sunken Madley Manor.





Floor tiles

Picturesque cottages yards from ​Monken Hadley Common’s western gate.





The Sinner’s Rue, Sunken Madley renowned pub, has local parallels in The Olde Mitre Inn and The Monken Holt, yards from Monken Hadley. The Waggon and Horses with it’s roaring fire (and legally fuelled, unlike The Sinner’s Rue!)  is further afield in Borehamwood, to the north of Monken Hadley. It is situation on the famous Roman road of Watling Street, which was originally a trackway used by the Britons over a thousand years ago. It would have been in existence at the time that Sunken Madley and the magical language of Wicc’yeth were forming.